Skip to content

Of all the “hot-button” words around diabetes, the one that rubs me the wrong way is “diabetic,” but only in certain contexts.

I don't mind when it describes a thing – diabetic neuropathy, diabetic glucometer, diabetic low – no problem. But diabetic patient. There’s an eclipsing of the person there that makes me a little twitchy.

But when it becomes a full-on noun, as with the diabetic who lives on my street? That's when I clear my throat and shift uncomfortably in my seat. To me it's reductive – the disease is defining the person. And there’s a connotation of permanence that I find dispiriting. At least “a person who has diabetes” might some day get rid of it...

This post was written for Diabetes Blog Week.
The Prompt:
Many advocate for the importance of using non-stigmatizing, inclusive and non-judgmental language when speaking about or to people with diabetes. Some don't care, others care passionately. Where do you stand?

For more perspectives on this topic, click here.

I was diagnosed with diabetes the summer before my sophomore year of high school. The initial treatment plan? “Take 2.5 mg of Glyburide daily and restrict sugar intake.” Because it was 1987 and glucometers weren’t available yet for home use, I was sent home with Tes-Tape® and instructions to test my urine about once a week or “whenever I felt like my blood sugar might be running high.”

For those who don't know, Tes-Tape® was a roll of litmus paper. You’d tear off an inch or so, pee on it, watch for a change in color, then compare the color to swatches on the back of the container. The darker the the paper, the greater the concentration of glucose in your urine. (For kidneys to spill glucose, your serum glucose level has exceed 180mg/DL, high enough to be causing damage. And by the time it shows up in your urine, it's likely been that way for several hours.) So, any color at all on the test strip indicated some degree of bad news (with no strategy for correction).

Tes-Tape
Image courtesy of perlebioscience.com

I carried the Tes-Tape® with me every day at school, zipped in an interior pocket of my backpack. I was supposed to have it with me, so I did. But I never, ever, would have used it while at school. (If you've ever had to pee on a narrow, inch-long strip of paper, you get it - it's messy!) So, no, I didn't test my urine in a high-school bathroom stall. And I didn't talk about diabetes much at school. None of my friends had diabetes. None of my friends' friends had diabetes. No teenager I had ever heard of had diabetes. And, like many teenagers, I just wanted to be perceived as normal.

Over Spring break that year I visited my friend in upstate New York. At some point during the trip, her aunt asked me, “I hear you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, how is that going for you?” I answered that it was OK, but that it was kind of drag not to be able to eat everything my friends ate. She listened, and offered this perspective:

Had I ever considered how movie stars ate? She went on to describe that movie stars - who lived lives of luxury and could eat anything they chose, elected to limit their intake of sugar because it was bad for their bodies, bad for their complexions, and contributed to premature aging. She wondered, had I given that any thought?

I had not, and it got my attention. What I heard was not so much the promise of everlasting beauty, but the message that I fit diabetes into a broader, more appealing framework, as long as everything was aligned. I didn’t have to decide that I was deprived of sugar; I could simply bypass it in favor of something better, like ripe, seasonal fruit. I remember this conversation often when I reach for a luscious pear instead of, say, a sugary doughnut. "What would Jennifer Anniston do?" I think.

This post was written for Diabetes Blog Week.
The Prompt:
How does diabetes affect you or your loved one mentally or emotionally?  Any tips, positive phrases, mantras, or ideas to share on getting out of a diabetes funk?

To read more posts on this topic, click here.

Hooray for Diabetes Blog Week! It’s as good an excuse as any for me to resume blogging (ahem), and a great opportunity to discover other diabetes bloggers. (Follow these links to see who else is participating and join in the fun! You can also follow along on Facebook or on Twitter with the hashtag #DBlogWeek.)

Today’s Prompt: Why are you here, in the diabetes blog space? 

In early 2004 I was pregnant with my first child. I had recently switched to insulin therapy since the pills I had been on for years were not FDA-approved for pregnancy. So, I was learning to count carbohydrates, manage multiple daily insulin injections, and minimize the effect of fluctuating hormones on blood sugar. I was excited about the eventual baby, but felt acutely overwhelmed and isolated by diabetes. I pined for someone who understood what I was experiencing.

I searched online and found a diabetes message forum run by the Joslin Diabetes Center. I drafted a short post describing my situation and asked if anyone could relate. When I logged on later that day I found FIVE friendly, supportive responses. One that I found especially encouraging was signed "Type 1 Mom of two grown sons, 20 & 23."

Years later I came across Kerri Morrone Sparling's highly relatable blog Six Until Me, and was again inspired by (wait for it...) a person with diabetes talking about what it's like to have diabetes. When I had trouble finding blogs specific to MODY (my form of diabetes), I realized I should start a blog of my own and contribute something to the conversations!

***

To learn why other people blog about diabetes, click here.

 

%d bloggers like this: