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Since yesterday would have been Edward Lear's birthday, how about a limerick?

The guest – we’ll call her Amalia –
Stood chatting amongst the regalia.
On hearing it squeal
She dared not reveal
The pump in between her mammalia.

Diabetes Blog Week 2014

This post was written for Diabetes Blog Week.
The prompt
(suggested by Tu Diabetes): Write a poem, rhyme, ballad, haiku, or any other form of poetry about diabetes.

I ran my first 5k yesterday.

I've never been much of a runner. So I downloaded a running app and started training the next day. I registered for a local race (Denver’s Adelante! 5k). Then I recruited a few pals to run with me once a week. The other days I ran on my own. In time, I began to look forward to the trainings as a way to spend time with people I don’t see often enough or to just zone out and listen to music.

With 7 weeks of training under my belt, I was feeling reasonably prepared on the day of the race. I ate an apple, drank some water, and stashed a juice box in my jacket pocket, just in case. My family came with me to cheer me on (it being Mothers’ Day, what choice had they?). I ran most of the way. And since I wasn’t running for any particular time, I was happy to complete the course in 36:12.

The numbers I care more about are the ones on my meter. And I was less happy with those yesterday. Given that I’d been testing and adjusting for weeks to determine a sensible strategy for the run, I was vexed by my body's response. Here’s what the day looked like in diabetes terms:

7:15 Test: 89mg/DL
8:15 Test: 81mg/DL
Eat apple (skip bolus) Preventively, to avoid mid-race low.
8:45 Decrease basal rate by 20% Again, preventively.
9:00 Run (mostly) for 36 min.
9:55 Test: 176mg/DL Woah…
Check site (it’s fine).
Bolus 2.5 units Hope that’s not too aggressive.
Hydrate.
10:10 Test: 172mg/DL Really?
Ponder test strip inaccuracy.
Verify recent changes to pump settings.
Second-guess skipping the apple bolus.
Second-guess the 20% basal decrease.
10:20 Test: 164mg/DL Still?
Bolus 1 more unit.
Head home.
Change site.
Spot a few air bubbles in line. Maybe?
Open new vial of insulin. It’s time anyway.
Continue to bolus against a stubborn high for most of the day. Sheesh.

It’s difficult to convey how damn squirrely diabetes is to people who don’t live with it every day. The best-laid plans often deliver uncertain results. It can be super frustrating. And yet, diabetes didn’t spoil yesterday; my first 5k was rewarding and fun.

Diabetes Blog Week 2014

This post was written for Diabetes Blog Week.
The prompt
(suggested by Kim of Texting my Pancreas): Change the World.  

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