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Here are my top four strategies for actually prioritizing exercise:

1. Find Your Optimal Workout Time
Mine is 6:15 AM. I like early morning workouts because:

  • The rest of my life generally doesn’t get in the way.
  • If something does interfere, I can often manage to squeeze something in later in the day (e.g. multiple short walks, evening run, etc.).
  • I can dial back on insulin for 2-3 hrs post-exercise. (That, in itself, is hugely motivating!)

2. Leverage Technology
Here’s what I’m using right now:

  • Garmin Connect logo Garmin Vivofit / Connect App – a gift from my family two Christmases ago.
  •  5K Runner App Logo 5kRunner App – this $2.99 investment helped me get in shape for my first 5k.
  •  audible logo Audible.com – I listen to books while I run. Actually, I don’t let myself listen to books unless I’m out for a run. I found a Groupon for a 3-month trial. I liked it so much, I continued the membership. (Did you know you can share a subscription with up to 3 other people? How great is that?)
  • Podcasts – I also listen to podcasts while I run. Current favorites include: The Moth, This American Life, New Yorker Fiction.

3. Invite Friends and Family.
I started with just one thing on this list. Once the habit was formed, I added something else, and so on. Here’s what I did:

  • Challenged my husband, who recently got a pedometer, to a 10,000-steps competition. (I know the 10,000 steps are arbitrary, but I still like having them as a milestone. In fact, those 10,000-steps are what inspired me to start running - because I didn’t have time to walk them all.)
  • Recruited a few friends to walk and/or run with me. It’s good for us all, right? Plus, it’s a great way to keep up with friends!
  • Invited a few other friends to go to Zumba with me. Just $5 a class at our local rec center. Great music, great company.
  • Signed up for a neighborhood 5k. Did I mention that I am was not a runner? (See what I did there? Now I am a runner.)
  • Invited my 11-year old to run with me on the weekends. (We take turns playing favorite songs for each other. I love learning what she’s into!)
  • Realized that my neighbor goes to the same gym I do. (Now we go to the gym together.)

4. Vary the Activities.
Here's what I'm doing now:

  • Cardio and weight lifting (2x/week)
  • Yoga (1x/week)
  • Running (2x/week)
  • Fast-walking (1x/week) or Hiking

How about you? How do you stay committed to exercise?

This post was written for Diabetes Blog Week.
The Prompt:
Diabetes tips and diabetes tricks. 

For more perspectives on this topic, click here.

My Healthcare Wish List (I can dream, right?)

The Doctor-Patient Relationship

  1. At my quarterly endo appointment, I see my actual endocrinologist.
  2. The appointment is scheduled for at least 30 minutes, allowing for thorough discussion and relationship building.
  3. My endocrinologist knows me as a person, and understands my health goals. We co-develop strategies to improve and maintain my health.
  4. All labs and appointments are designed in service to human beings – patients and doctors – rather than in service to the health insurance industry.

The Health and Wellness Center (formerly “Medical Center”)

  1. What used to be known as a "Medical Center" is now called a “Health and Wellness Center” (like this one), reflecting a emphasis on health rather than medicine.
  2. The Health and Wellness Center houses:
    • my primary care doctor's office
    • a gym
    • a nutritionist / dietician / Certified Diabetes Educator
    • a massage therapist
    • a café serving fresh, healthful food (with nutrition info)
  3. The Health and Wellness Center is located near my home so I can walk or bike to it.

Integrated Technology

  1. My BG monitor and insulin pump seamlessly communicate with each other.
  2. I maintain my own Electronic Health Record (EHR) which pulls in information from all my doctor(s).

Insurance Companies

  1. Insurance companies have no place in the perfect world I envision.

This post was written for Diabetes Blog Week.
Today's Prompt:
How would you improve or change your healthcare experience? 

For more perspectives on this topic, click here.

Of all the “hot-button” words around diabetes, the one that rubs me the wrong way is “diabetic,” but only in certain contexts.

I don't mind when it describes a thing – diabetic neuropathy, diabetic glucometer, diabetic low – no problem. But diabetic patient. There’s an eclipsing of the person there that makes me a little twitchy.

But when it becomes a full-on noun, as with the diabetic who lives on my street? That's when I clear my throat and shift uncomfortably in my seat. To me it's reductive – the disease is defining the person. And there’s a connotation of permanence that I find dispiriting. At least “a person who has diabetes” might some day get rid of it...

This post was written for Diabetes Blog Week.
The Prompt:
Many advocate for the importance of using non-stigmatizing, inclusive and non-judgmental language when speaking about or to people with diabetes. Some don't care, others care passionately. Where do you stand?

For more perspectives on this topic, click here.

I was diagnosed with diabetes the summer before my sophomore year of high school. The initial treatment plan? “Take 2.5 mg of Glyburide daily and restrict sugar intake.” Because it was 1987 and glucometers weren’t available yet for home use, I was sent home with Tes-Tape® and instructions to test my urine about once a week or “whenever I felt like my blood sugar might be running high.”

For those who don't know, Tes-Tape® was a roll of litmus paper. You’d tear off an inch or so, pee on it, watch for a change in color, then compare the color to swatches on the back of the container. The darker the the paper, the greater the concentration of glucose in your urine. (For kidneys to spill glucose, your serum glucose level has exceed 180mg/DL, high enough to be causing damage. And by the time it shows up in your urine, it's likely been that way for several hours.) So, any color at all on the test strip indicated some degree of bad news (with no strategy for correction).

Tes-Tape
Image courtesy of perlebioscience.com

I carried the Tes-Tape® with me every day at school, zipped in an interior pocket of my backpack. I was supposed to have it with me, so I did. But I never, ever, would have used it while at school. (If you've ever had to pee on a narrow, inch-long strip of paper, you get it - it's messy!) So, no, I didn't test my urine in a high-school bathroom stall. And I didn't talk about diabetes much at school. None of my friends had diabetes. None of my friends' friends had diabetes. No teenager I had ever heard of had diabetes. And, like many teenagers, I just wanted to be perceived as normal.

Over Spring break that year I visited my friend in upstate New York. At some point during the trip, her aunt asked me, “I hear you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, how is that going for you?” I answered that it was OK, but that it was kind of drag not to be able to eat everything my friends ate. She listened, and offered this perspective:

Had I ever considered how movie stars ate? She went on to describe that movie stars - who lived lives of luxury and could eat anything they chose, elected to limit their intake of sugar because it was bad for their bodies, bad for their complexions, and contributed to premature aging. She wondered, had I given that any thought?

I had not, and it got my attention. What I heard was not so much the promise of everlasting beauty, but the message that I fit diabetes into a broader, more appealing framework, as long as everything was aligned. I didn’t have to decide that I was deprived of sugar; I could simply bypass it in favor of something better, like ripe, seasonal fruit. I remember this conversation often when I reach for a luscious pear instead of, say, a sugary doughnut. "What would Jennifer Anniston do?" I think.

This post was written for Diabetes Blog Week.
The Prompt:
How does diabetes affect you or your loved one mentally or emotionally?  Any tips, positive phrases, mantras, or ideas to share on getting out of a diabetes funk?

To read more posts on this topic, click here.

Hooray for Diabetes Blog Week! It’s as good an excuse as any for me to resume blogging (ahem), and a great opportunity to discover other diabetes bloggers. (Follow these links to see who else is participating and join in the fun! You can also follow along on Facebook or on Twitter with the hashtag #DBlogWeek.)

Today’s Prompt: Why are you here, in the diabetes blog space? 

In early 2004 I was pregnant with my first child. I had recently switched to insulin therapy since the pills I had been on for years were not FDA-approved for pregnancy. So, I was learning to count carbohydrates, manage multiple daily insulin injections, and minimize the effect of fluctuating hormones on blood sugar. I was excited about the eventual baby, but felt acutely overwhelmed and isolated by diabetes. I pined for someone who understood what I was experiencing.

I searched online and found a diabetes message forum run by the Joslin Diabetes Center. I drafted a short post describing my situation and asked if anyone could relate. When I logged on later that day I found FIVE friendly, supportive responses. One that I found especially encouraging was signed "Type 1 Mom of two grown sons, 20 & 23."

Years later I came across Kerri Morrone Sparling's highly relatable blog Six Until Me, and was again inspired by (wait for it...) a person with diabetes talking about what it's like to have diabetes. When I had trouble finding blogs specific to MODY (my form of diabetes), I realized I should start a blog of my own and contribute something to the conversations!

***

To learn why other people blog about diabetes, click here.

 

Since yesterday would have been Edward Lear's birthday, how about a limerick?

The guest – we’ll call her Amalia –
Stood chatting amongst the regalia.
On hearing it squeal
She dared not reveal
The pump in between her mammalia.

Diabetes Blog Week 2014

This post was written for Diabetes Blog Week.
The prompt
(suggested by Tu Diabetes): Write a poem, rhyme, ballad, haiku, or any other form of poetry about diabetes.

I ran my first 5k yesterday.

I've never been much of a runner. So I downloaded a running app and started training the next day. I registered for a local race (Denver’s Adelante! 5k). Then I recruited a few pals to run with me once a week. The other days I ran on my own. In time, I began to look forward to the trainings as a way to spend time with people I don’t see often enough or to just zone out and listen to music.

With 7 weeks of training under my belt, I was feeling reasonably prepared on the day of the race. I ate an apple, drank some water, and stashed a juice box in my jacket pocket, just in case. My family came with me to cheer me on (it being Mothers’ Day, what choice had they?). I ran most of the way. And since I wasn’t running for any particular time, I was happy to complete the course in 36:12.

The numbers I care more about are the ones on my meter. And I was less happy with those yesterday. Given that I’d been testing and adjusting for weeks to determine a sensible strategy for the run, I was vexed by my body's response. Here’s what the day looked like in diabetes terms:

7:15 Test: 89mg/DL
8:15 Test: 81mg/DL
Eat apple (skip bolus) Preventively, to avoid mid-race low.
8:45 Decrease basal rate by 20% Again, preventively.
9:00 Run (mostly) for 36 min.
9:55 Test: 176mg/DL Woah…
Check site (it’s fine).
Bolus 2.5 units Hope that’s not too aggressive.
Hydrate.
10:10 Test: 172mg/DL Really?
Ponder test strip inaccuracy.
Verify recent changes to pump settings.
Second-guess skipping the apple bolus.
Second-guess the 20% basal decrease.
10:20 Test: 164mg/DL Still?
Bolus 1 more unit.
Head home.
Change site.
Spot a few air bubbles in line. Maybe?
Open new vial of insulin. It’s time anyway.
Continue to bolus against a stubborn high for most of the day. Sheesh.

It’s difficult to convey how damn squirrely diabetes is to people who don’t live with it every day. The best-laid plans often deliver uncertain results. It can be super frustrating. And yet, diabetes didn’t spoil yesterday; my first 5k was rewarding and fun.

Diabetes Blog Week 2014

This post was written for Diabetes Blog Week.
The prompt
(suggested by Kim of Texting my Pancreas): Change the World.  

2

4th Annual Diabetes Blg Week 2013

Today's post was written for Diabetes Blog Week.
The Prompt:
 Other diabetes blogs worth reading.

Yesterday I found Ilana Lucas’s Diaturgy. Her post Ode to an Insulin Pump led me to explore the site and smallish collection of well written and interesting posts.

I found Meredith Pack’s blog, With a Side of Insulin, today. There’s no post in particular, I just find the entire blog relatable and fun to read.

I was glad to see a couple of familiar blog names:

  • Texting My Pancreas – Great name and the blog itself is well written with a sense of fun. The day I found this site, I stayed a long while clicking, reading, clicking…
  • Six Until Me – In a post titled "Memories" Kerri describes her experience of a childhood low and her Mom helping her through it. Her story affected me even more as a parent than as a person with diabetes.

(Thanks to Pearlsa of A Girl's Reflections for inspiring today's topic.)

This wraps up my first Diabetes Blog Week. Thanks very much to Karen at Bitter-Sweet for organizing it and for creating connections within the DOC.

Here's an empowering poem by Ogden Nash. I like to imagine diabetes as the bear.

Isabel met an enormous bear,
Isabel, Isabel, didn't care;
The bear was hungry, the bear was ravenous,
The bear's big mouth was cruel and cavernous.
The bear said, Isabel, glad to meet you,
How do, Isabel, now I'll eat you!

Isabel, Isabel, didn't worry.
Isabel didn't scream or scurry.
She washed her hands and she straightened her hair up,
Then Isabel quietly ate the bear up.

Once in a night as black as pitch
Isabel met a wicked old witch.
The witch's face was cross and wrinkled,
The witch's gums with teeth were sprinkled.
Ho, ho, Isabel! the old witch crowed,
I'll turn you into an ugly toad!

Isabel, Isabel, didn't worry,
Isabel didn't scream or scurry,
She showed no rage and she showed no rancor,
But she turned the witch into milk and drank her.

Isabel met a hideous giant,
Isabel continued self reliant.
The giant was hairy, the giant was horrid,
He had one eye in the middle of his forehead.
Good morning, Isabel, the giant said,
I'll grind your bones to make my bread.

Isabel, Isabel, didn't worry,
Isabel didn't scream or scurry.
She nibbled the zwieback that she always fed off,
And when it was gone, she cut the giant's head off.

Isabel met a troublesome doctor,
He punched and he poked till he really shocked her.
The doctor's talk was of coughs and chills
And the doctor's satchel bulged with pills.
The doctor said unto Isabel,
Swallow this, it will make you well.

Isabel, Isabel, didn't worry,
Isabel didn't scream or scurry.
She took those pills from the pill concocter,
And Isabel calmly cured the doctor.

- by Ogden Nash

4th Annual Diabetes Blg Week 2013

This post was written for Diabetes Blog Week
The Prompt: Essentially, share some art.

1

Here's the dream device I want: an integrated CGM/Insulin-pump device.

Along with that, I’d like a food log with voice recognition capabilities. It should also be able to track other diabetes details, like:

  • How much sleep did I get last night?
  • Am I stressed out? Under the weather?
  • Did I exercise today? At what time? For how long?
  • Am I properly hydrated?
  • How many days since last site change?
  • How old is this insulin?

It would be really fantastic if the device could learn some of this information through observation. Maybe there’s an embedded pedometer or fit-bit that tracks movement?

This artificial pancreas is a good start.

4th Annual Diabetes Blg Week 2013

This post was written for Diabetes Blog Week
The Prompt:
Tell us what your fantasy diabetes device would be. 

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